Pushing the Boundaries of Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum (NISQ) Computing

Quantum physics has an enormous potential to transform computing technology. When making the leap from a PC or supercomputer to a quantum computer, the logical processing and the physical basis change in dramatic ways. The basis for the PC is classical physics, but for the quantum computer it is quantum physics, opening the door to non-intuitive properties such as superposition and entanglement. On the logical side, the elementary unit of information changes from the bit to the qubit, allowing for entirely novel  ways of data processing.

Quantum computers with a restricted number of qubits have recently been demonstrated in several laboratories. However, owing to the unusual properties of quantum algorithms even a small number of qubits may be sufficient to obtain meaningful computational results.  The goal of this research program is to demonstrate that existing and near-term (5-8 years) quantum computing (QC) technologies can be used to generate meaningful computational results of scientic and/or commercial value that cannot be efficiently obtained through classical computation alone. It will approach this through a unique-to-QMI coordinated effort to develop novel strategies for using present day (NISQ-era) QC hardware. We will focus on:

  1. Fundamental quantum computing theory relevant to the potential use of symmetry and topological properties of quantum states
     
  2. The experimental realization of novel quantum hardware designed to carry out special purpose quantum simulations, and
     
  3. The integration of 1 and 2, along with conventional quantum and classical programming, into a hybrid approach employing Bayesian machine learning. The utility of these novel strategies will be tested by applying them to solve a select set of scientifically important problems, chosen mostly from the field of Quantum Materials. 

Once validated in specific applications, the QC techniques we develop should be generally applicable to a wide range of other engineering, economic, medical and materials problems.


Principal Investigators


Robert Raussendorf, Team Lead 
SBQMI
UBC Physics & Astronomy


Ian Affleck
SBQMI
UBC Physics & Astronomy


Mona Berciu
SBQMI
UBC Physics & Astronomy


Sarah Burke
SBQMI
UBC Physics & Astronomy


Lukas Chrostowski
SBQMI
UBC Electrical & Computer Engineering


Josh Folk
SBQMI
UBC Physics & Astronomy


Marcel Franz
SBQMI
UBC Physics & Astronomy


Roman Krems
SBQMI collaborator
UBC Chemistry


Joe Salfi
SBQMI Collaborator
UBC Electrical & Computer Engineering


Jeff Young
SBQMI
UBC Physics & Astronomy


Eran Sela
SBQMI Collaborator
University of Tel Aviv


Current Opportunities

SBQMI is looking to fill a number of important positions for this high-profile project. The team will work closely together to deliver the objectives set out above. Postdoctoral fellows will be expected to exhibit leadership and be able to work independently to deliver results. Contact Robert Raussendorf if you would like to find out more about the role.